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Kurapia Isn’t Growing

Symptom

Instead of growing evenly over the entire space, the runners’ growth is shaped like starfish. Anthocyanin* is present even in warm weather and causes the leaves to turn purple. *Anthocyanin is a water-soluble pigmentation that causes fruits and flowers to look red, blue, or purple.

Cause

Lack of fertilization in the soil.

Solution

Addition of fertilizer. Fertilizer does not hold well in sandy soil such as decomposed granite. Addition of 100 day slow release fertilizer is recommended.

Dried Up

Symptom

The plant dried up entirely.

Cause

Not enough water, shallow planting of the seedling.

Solution

Water regularly after planting until the Kurapia takes root. Shallow planting results in gaps between the roots and the soil, so plant the Kurapia deeper and provide plenty of water. Once the Kurapia takes root, do not water unless it is used in green-roofing or planted in sandy soil. Watering over long periods of time will result in the roots becoming damaged or diseased.

Kurapia is too tall

Symptom

Overgrowth of Kurapia

Cause

Too much water, too much fertilizer

Remedy

Mow the Kurapia. After mowing, use water sparingly, and do not water too frequently.

Other

When planted, Kurapia’s roots will first start to grow. During this time, the stem and leaves will not grow. After the roots have grown, the stem and leaves will start to grow. If it has been one month since planting (with an average temperature of 55.4 degrees Fahrenheit) and the stem and leaves don’t grow and cover ground, then there is most likely a problem and mitigating measures must be taken.